Jump to content
BooksandTrees

COVID19 (Coronavirus) and Gaming Addiction

Recommended Posts

Hi Everyone,

As you are aware there is a global pandemic with COVID19, a coronavirus, which comes from the same family as SARS and MERS. My strong advice is to stay informed with accurate information from the World Health Organization (WHO), Center for Disease Control (CDC), and your local government and hospital's websites. They will have the most accurate information regarding how to handle the virus.

Please do not use this time to delve into conspiracy theories regarding the disease or blaming politicians. This website should be more about how to handle your gaming addiction and other habits in general. Let's do our best not to share anything that's not pure factual information from that website and focus on addiction recovery.

In regard to addiction recovery, I urge all of you to realize and understand the challenges you might be facing during this pandemic. 

Millions have been told to stay home and start social distancing. This puts people back in front of their computers, TVs, and entertainment centers once again. This may provide a challenging moment for you and many others. 

I invite you all to find another level of strength during this period of time. Gaming urges might become higher because of our environment and increased isolation from social activities and communities. It might lead people to going on Discord more and eventually back into gaming communities. Use this time to reflect on your video game addiction experience thus far. Take some time over the next few weeks to physically write out a list of why you quit gaming in the first place. Write and reflect on how you feel right now and how your recovery has changed your life over this time you've been a member of this community. 

Use this document as a decree of your sobriety. Your tenants for success. This will give you strength.

After that, I encourage you to use this time as an invitation to positively and freely explore new hobbies that could require a computer. @Cam Adair and the Game Quitters have the hobby finding tool on their main website located here: https://gamequitters.com/hobby-tool/

YouTube has a plethora of free tutorials for home body workouts, yoga, meditation, software instructions for adobe video, sound, and photo editing software, 3d modeling softwares like blender that are free to install, arts and crafts, new careers such as IT training and much more. There's also book lists and ebooks you can do. You could also write book and movie reviews or write that hit book you've dreamed of writing.

Just because you have increased isolation time doesn't mean you need to panic or resort to playing video games again. Use this as an invitation to find new hobbies and/or higher learning opportunities.

Thanks and good luck,

Matt

Edited by BooksandTrees
  • Like 11

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great post.

I'll also add that I'm going to be adding a huge new section to the forum soon that'll have people develop their skills, take part in creative challenges, measure their growth and more! On top of this we'll be trying to provide as many resources as we can for people to stay safe and gaming-free during the outbreak.

Take care!

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for this post!

Got on the forums today for this very reason. It's been hard working from home, especially only 1.5 months into my detox. It's great to have this community to come to when I'm feeling alone in my journey to end my bad gaming habits (solo and all forms of online gaming).

My heart goes out to you all at Game Quitters. It has been a huge facilitator and motivator in this process.

I'll lend my support in any way I can.

-J

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Joesulc said:

Thanks for this post!

Got on the forums today for this very reason. It's been hard working from home, especially only 1.5 months into my detox. It's great to have this community to come to when I'm feeling alone in my journey to end my bad gaming habits (solo and all forms of online gaming).

My heart goes out to you all at Game Quitters. It has been a huge facilitator and motivator in this process.

I'll lend my support in any way I can.

-J

Great job being proactive and coming here. Create a diary and start journaling your thoughts along this time we're experiencing. Also, journal what you are doing and talk about your new hobbies, goals and challenges with them. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Some of the conspiracy theories are hilarious. I'll leave it at that. 🙂

I have recommended to all of my friends that they should really be getting their info straight from the horse's mouth. The CDC has a YouTube page and all of their COVID-19 videos bizarrely have less than 2,000 views. This is the actual organization studying and attempting to control the outbreak but people are going to places like Facebook and Reddit to get info from people who have no clue what they're talking about. I suppose this is nothing new. 🙂

I work for the government so I have a different perspective than many people I suppose. Our whole job right now is basically to get people to stop touching their faces. Lol

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm pinning and featuring this topic for the time being. @BooksandTrees you did an amazing job writing this. Thank you.

I've been in this community since almost the beginning and all my recovery process has been about escaping from self-imposed isolation, but this situation is new for me as well. Your reminder is accurate and with great timing. Out there it's just a slightly overpowered flu, not like the end of the world, but we gotta live through this quarantine and that's how things are. This is a great opportunity to support each other and grow, so let's keep it together, everyone! 

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've grown a lot on here. I never was able to quit gaming and was hopeless to quit before I got on game quitters. It's given me a better life where I'm not controlled by addictions anymore.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/newsbeat-51907663

Now this might divide opinion and I know that Cam's approach, probably the best way of looking at it, is that gaming isn't inherently bad...

But I find news articles like this, that actually appeared on the HOME PAGE of the BBC website, not just the news, entertainment or newsbeat section, but the root page...incredibly irresponsible.  I guess it's more aimed at people who might otherwise have control and not spend hours upon hours gaming, or be trying to quit.  But surely this outbreak is the perfect time to discover something new, something you haven't already tried or done.  Spend more time with your family.  I'm worried that people who do have control and aren't addicted might just end up gaming for hours because they have nothing to stop them, then struggle to make the transition back to everyday life after weeks at home used to not having any routines.

I mean...the writer even uses the word obsession to describe how they feel about the new CoD.  C'mon.

I guess my message to people would be to not let things like this be the permission you have to slip back, give in and blame a major world event as an excuse to break your word to yourself and those around you.  Stay strong, be vigilant and write about everything you've learnt about gaming, yourself and the world around you since you started this journey.

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Talby said:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/newsbeat-51907663

Now this might divide opinion and I know that Cam's approach, probably the best way of looking at it, is that gaming isn't inherently bad...

We have a certain reaction to articles like this given our history but to ordinary people this isn't really that bad. "Obsession" and "addiction" are just words people throw around that don't have any inherent meaning for them. When I first got out of rehab I got pretty annoyed when someone would say something like "I got so drunk this weekend oh my gaawwwd I'm such an alcoholicccc" but I got over it in time. People don't generally think about what they say, and as we've seen with the current situation journalists often don't think about what they write (shots fired).

You're spot on though that we shouldn't use this as an excuse to "isolate" and play games all day. I'm not even isolating, to be honest. If I get sick, I get sick. I'm doing everything I can to not be around people who might be vulnerable to it but honestly most of us are just going to get a cold from it. Considering I'm still forced to go to work at a government office where the dirtiest, mentally ill people come in and out all day, I've basically just accepted that I'm going to get sick sooner or later. Lol.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, Talby said:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/newsbeat-51907663

Now this might divide opinion and I know that Cam's approach, probably the best way of looking at it, is that gaming isn't inherently bad...

But I find news articles like this, that actually appeared on the HOME PAGE of the BBC website, not just the news, entertainment or newsbeat section, but the root page...incredibly irresponsible.  I guess it's more aimed at people who might otherwise have control and not spend hours upon hours gaming, or be trying to quit.  But surely this outbreak is the perfect time to discover something new, something you haven't already tried or done.  Spend more time with your family.  I'm worried that people who do have control and aren't addicted might just end up gaming for hours because they have nothing to stop them, then struggle to make the transition back to everyday life after weeks at home used to not having any routines.

I mean...the writer even uses the word obsession to describe how they feel about the new CoD.  C'mon.

I guess my message to people would be to not let things like this be the permission you have to slip back, give in and blame a major world event as an excuse to break your word to yourself and those around you.  Stay strong, be vigilant and write about everything you've learnt about gaming, yourself and the world around you since you started this journey.

Exactly my point. This person might also be an avid gamer undecided whether it's bad for them. I have done this with porn saying it's not hurting me and I can do it while I'm single and it just ruins my life completely. We know better and that's why I wrote this post. We can be strong and keep our streak.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
19 hours ago, Talby said:

I'm worried that people who do have control and aren't addicted might just end up gaming for hours because they have nothing to stop them, then struggle to make the transition back to everyday life after weeks at home used to not having any routines.

Honestly, I am not sure if most people actually have this kind of control over their lives. I think that if they had, what you are describing wouldn't happen. I'd even argue the weakness of the whole system as it is is that once we turn 6, we are forced to spend an increasing time at school and later on at work. But except for a few people, nobody makes that decision consciously. I think part of being a true adult is being able to redirect those 40, 50 or even 60 hours of extra waking time towards something meaningful, but also reasonably fun, even if you didn't ask for them. Survive and adapt!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just wanted to update everyone and give an example of how I'm spending my days:

Monday-Friday

  • Wake up at 6:45, Breakfast/weigh myself
  • 7-11 work, 11 Lunch, 12-4 Work
  • 4-430 exercise/stretch, 4:30 shower
  • 5 cook and eat dinner, watch a tv show
  • 6:30 practice a hobby or two
  • 8:30 relax for an hour then read and in bed by 10:45

Saturday and Sunday

  • Wake up at 6:45, breakfast/weigh myself
  • Go for a walk or do some yoga
  • Study for 2 hours, watch a tv show for an hour or maybe watch a movie
  • Do hobbies for at least 4 hours the rest of the weekend total, not each day. I don't want to stress out learning new stuff
  • Talk to family and friends on the phone for 1-3 hours
  • Read/draw/cook some meals for meal prepping
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Cool breakdown of the day. I definitely need something like this. I have a few questions.

15 minutes straight from bed to work is pretty amazing. Do you have breakfast and lunch prepared for the next day in advance? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
50 minutes ago, Rualani said:

Cool breakdown of the day. I definitely need something like this. I have a few questions.

15 minutes straight from bed to work is pretty amazing. Do you have breakfast and lunch prepared for the next day in advance? 

No, but eggs take 2 minutes to cook and toast takes 5 minutes. I eat in 5-10 minutes and I'm ready to go. I'm working from home right now so I don't have to commute. If it was at work just add commute time + 5 minutes to get dressed. I shower at night. I meal prep for lunch and dinner is all.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, BooksandTrees said:

Just wanted to update everyone and give an example of how I'm spending my days:

Monday-Friday

  • Wake up at 6:45, Breakfast/weigh myself
  • 7-11 work, 11 Lunch, 12-4 Work
  • 4-430 exercise/stretch, 4:30 shower
  • 5 cook and eat dinner, watch a tv show
  • 6:30 practice a hobby or two
  • 8:30 relax for an hour then read and in bed by 10:45

Saturday and Sunday

  • Wake up at 6:45, breakfast/weigh myself
  • Go for a walk or do some yoga
  • Study for 2 hours, watch a tv show for an hour or maybe watch a movie
  • Do hobbies for at least 4 hours the rest of the weekend total, not each day. I don't want to stress out learning new stuff
  • Talk to family and friends on the phone for 1-3 hours
  • Read/draw/cook some meals for meal prepping

Sounds like you've got your routines sussed quite well even before Covid! You're at a place I'm working towards 😁

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/19/2020 at 9:31 PM, ceponatia said:

We have a certain reaction to articles like this given our history but to ordinary people this isn't really that bad. "Obsession" and "addiction" are just words people throw around that don't have any inherent meaning for them. When I first got out of rehab I got pretty annoyed when someone would say something like "I got so drunk this weekend oh my gaawwwd I'm such an alcoholicccc" but I got over it in time. People don't generally think about what they say, and as we've seen with the current situation journalists often don't think about what they write (shots fired).

You're spot on though that we shouldn't use this as an excuse to "isolate" and play games all day. I'm not even isolating, to be honest. If I get sick, I get sick. I'm doing everything I can to not be around people who might be vulnerable to it but honestly most of us are just going to get a cold from it. Considering I'm still forced to go to work at a government office where the dirtiest, mentally ill people come in and out all day, I've basically just accepted that I'm going to get sick sooner or later. Lol.

 

On 3/20/2020 at 1:54 AM, BooksandTrees said:

Exactly my point. This person might also be an avid gamer undecided whether it's bad for them. I have done this with porn saying it's not hurting me and I can do it while I'm single and it just ruins my life completely. We know better and that's why I wrote this post. We can be strong and keep our streak.

 

20 hours ago, Ikar said:

Honestly, I am not sure if most people actually have this kind of control over their lives. I think that if they had, what you are describing wouldn't happen. I'd even argue the weakness of the whole system as it is is that once we turn 6, we are forced to spend an increasing time at school and later on at work. But except for a few people, nobody makes that decision consciously. I think part of being a true adult is being able to redirect those 40, 50 or even 60 hours of extra waking time towards something meaningful, but also reasonably fun, even if you didn't ask for them. Survive and adapt!

Cool. Thanks for the discussion folks. I was pretty riled up that day so wanted some clear heads to help calm me down. Good to see different opinions and also hear how some people deal with hearing or seeing things that might trigger negative emotions linked to gaming. 

The problem I have with the tone and nature of it is that the more I get out and about again, the more I see gaming less as a hobby and more like watching TV, just a way of passing time without actually learning anything. So when somebody recommends people use their free time... It's like our national broadcaster just asked some kid to write an article which ended up being "Omg all the time to gamezzz..." and then stuck it on their home page. Grr. Made me angry. 

I also used to be a junior school teacher and met so many kids who just wanted to be a YouTube star and play games when they grew up. I guess my own problems tie into how I dealt with that emotionally as well. 

Thanks again for the counter views and support. You're a great bunch to have around to talk about this stuff 😉👍

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Talby said:

The problem I have with the tone and nature of it is that the more I get out and about again, the more I see gaming less as a hobby and more like watching TV, just a way of passing time without actually learning anything. So when somebody recommends people use their free time... It's like our national broadcaster just asked some kid to write an article which ended up being "Omg all the time to gamezzz..." and then stuck it on their home page. Grr. Made me angry. 

The reason I never liked watching series or even YT videos was that it was too passive, compared to gaming or Twitch. The latter two can have a surprising amount of social interaction tied to them. Tied to that, a self-sufficient and relatively famous streamer actually has a life outside of streaming with a healthy social circle around him.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Ikar said:

The reason I never liked watching series or even YT videos was that it was too passive, compared to gaming or Twitch. The latter two can have a surprising amount of social interaction tied to them. Tied to that, a self-sufficient and relatively famous streamer actually has a life outside of streaming with a healthy social circle around him.

I also felt like that, however that's where I believe the problem lies. Gaming has become so much more than just a way to unwind and waste time. At least watching TV is passive, I feel like it has an end point, at some point I want to get up and walk away from it all. With gaming once I started I didn't want to do anything else because how can any other activity live up to the promise of a modern AAA game?

I understand the social connection arguments around gaming, but I didn't have that. I shut myself away from people to game because I was escaping from some stuff, not sure what yet cause my counselling hasn't started. I made friends through hobbies outside of gaming when I was younger and my relationships with them only suffered when I retreated again. 

Personally, and this is purely opinion, I don't buy into the career talk and social side of gaming with twitch and YouTube. I know people are making money, I get that because every time I raise a concern I get bludgeoned with the same argument again and again. It feels very Hollywood, where everyone looks happy and putting on an awesome face because that's what they need to do to get the views, sponsors, donations etc. I'm happy for people who make something of it, they've clearly got a touch of the innovative about them coupled with a good support network. But I worry about the greater % hanging on their every word, just as with other celebrities in other industries. 

And that's the key for me. Nobody sees the reality of the rise to fame and glory. If articles encouraging people to increase their time gaming are going to pop up as 'advice' on websites that are supposed to be reputable, it makes them no better than clickbait in my eyes because every person's life is different. It's time you just can't get back and if you don't have families that essentially keep you whilst you indulge then you're risking an awful lot, particularly during a pandemic like this.

I hope nobody thinks I'm being harsh. I'm very passionate about these issues from working with vulnerable kids and adults in the past. I'm happy gaming isn't stigmatised as much as it used to be when I was a kid, however at the same time I do feel that the current trend of it becoming so mainstream and high profile is only sucking more gullible people in with the simple aim of pumping as much money out of them as possible. Creating more addicts and leaving parents, carers, key workers etc at a loss when they're considered less of an authority than some dude on YouTube.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Talby said:

I understand the social connection arguments around gaming, but I didn't have that. I shut myself away from people to game because I was escaping from some stuff, not sure what yet cause my counselling hasn't started. I made friends through hobbies outside of gaming when I was younger and my relationships with them only suffered when I retreated again. 

Personally, and this is purely opinion, I don't buy into the career talk and social side of gaming with twitch and YouTube. I know people are making money, I get that because every time I raise a concern I get bludgeoned with the same argument again and again. It feels very Hollywood, where everyone looks happy and putting on an awesome face because that's what they need to do to get the views, sponsors, donations etc. I'm happy for people who make something of it, they've clearly got a touch of the innovative about them coupled with a good support network. But I worry about the greater % hanging on their every word, just as with other celebrities in other industries. 

And that's the key for me. Nobody sees the reality of the rise to fame and glory. If articles encouraging people to increase their time gaming are going to pop up as 'advice' on websites that are supposed to be reputable, it makes them no better than clickbait in my eyes because every person's life is different. It's time you just can't get back and if you don't have families that essentially keep you whilst you indulge then you're risking an awful lot, particularly during a pandemic like this.

I hope nobody thinks I'm being harsh. I'm very passionate about these issues from working with vulnerable kids and adults in the past. I'm happy gaming isn't stigmatised as much as it used to be when I was a kid, however at the same time I do feel that the current trend of it becoming so mainstream and high profile is only sucking more gullible people in with the simple aim of pumping as much money out of them as possible.

I believe that since addictions are unconscious, then they mirror our unconscious needs perfectly. @BooksandTrees , @James Good or I are former ex-streamers. My real-world social interactions sucked, so I started with a blank slate online, posting on various forums and streaming. Gaming is a world within a world and it really was whatever I wanted it to be. It was a bit different for each of us.

I think we'll pull through. Gaming is living its golden age now. Before that, it was TV, alcohol or tobacco. Are people wasting their time and money and eventually dying? Yes. Is money being made off of that? Yes. It's always been like that and I think it always will be.

I don't think I am being cynical though. I was supposed to be giving a talk in about a month in one community center regarding my gaming addiction (or rather, just talking about my life). I just think that if you "get bludgeoned with the same argument again and again", you're better off finding an audience that might be receptive to the message you are trying to convey.

2 hours ago, Talby said:

Creating more addicts and leaving parents, carers, key workers etc at a loss when they're considered less of an authority than some dude on YouTube.

The sad part is that all those parents, teachers and other people with authority likely did not contribute as much as they could to the development of the child (adult), if "some dude on YouTube" has more influence over the child's (adult's) life. The question should be "How can I become a parent my child could look up to and follow as an example?", not "How can I stop my child from being addicted?"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Ikar said:

 

The sad part is that all those parents, teachers and other people with authority likely did not contribute as much as they could to the development of the child (adult), if "some dude on YouTube" has more influence over the child's (adult's) life. The question should be "How can I become a parent my child could look up to and follow as an example?", not "How can I stop my child from being addicted?"

Ok. Father is the typical bread winner in the family. As such he spends significant time away from his son. The son is unaware of what the father does beyond his explanations and then it may not even sound so exciting and encouraging. Father’s energy may be lacking at the end of the day (especially if he is pushing his limits to achieve a better well being for his family as a whole). So the television set or the internet will have more time to influence his child. 

So what can this Dad do? If he throws away the tv set and the smart phone, buys all sorts of learning toys and games, teaches the kid to exercise, he will be healthier, but still the father will need to put in a LOT of effort to build trust and understanding with the kid.

The commerce bombards and programs the kid a lot. So it is an uphill struggle.

Edited by Amphibian220

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, Amphibian220 said:

Ok. Father is the typical bread winner in the family. As such he spends significant time away from his son. The son is unaware of what the father does beyond his explanations and then it may not even sound so exciting and encouraging. Father’s energy may be lacking at the end of the day (especially if he is pushing his limits to achieve a better well being for his family as a whole). So the television set or the internet will have more time to influence his child. 

So what can this Dad do? If he throws away the tv set and the smart phone, buys all sorts of learning toys and games, teaches the kid to exercise, he will be healthier, but still the father will need to put in a LOT of effort to build trust and understanding with the kid.

The commerce bombards and programs the kid a lot. So it is an uphill struggle.

I am of the opinion that father's role in the family is to provide more of the "cold love" (discipline, direction guidance, responsibility) and mom's role is to provide more of the "warm love" (hugs and emotional connection) for their kids. I'm not dogmatic, but I think it works that way in the typical family.

The typical family is also primarily thought of being a father, a mother and their kids. I also think it is correct to say fathers genuinely have less time/more obstacles in spending time with their kids than moms due to work and other activities.

The issue with that is the typical child in today's age, unless they have a caring father that can be there for them every day, has no good masculine model. Primary and secondary schools? Most of the teachers are women. Parents are divorced? Likely spending more time with mom than with dad.

I also like the idea my friend presented that lives of males tend to be more extreme. Most of the famous world-leading personalities are men. Most of the homeless people are men too. I also think it also partly explains why most gaming addicts are males as @James Good pointed out once on a podcast. When I set out to do something, I absolutely love it when I can give it my 150%. Gaming/streaming did that for me. Hunt down the mammoth and then rest, as it used to be in the past.

---

Above are good statistical arguments for how difficult is it to raise a child (boy) in today's age. I'm gonna present you with some questions now based on how you structured your post. Take time to answer them.

Are you sure you prioritize your life correctly, if you are lacking energy at the end of the day as a father? Do you work to help your family? Or do you work to evade your family duties? Do you live to work? Or do you work to live?

Do you think raising a child should be easy, or difficult? Are you willing to let go of some materialistic goods to spend more time with your family?

---

Some other thoughts; I'm writing them down, because I am writing a blog post on a topic close to this.

Gaming addicts tend to not be poor in a way that would threaten their survival. It takes time (and money) to afford the "luxury" of being addicted. It explains why most people on GQ are from the West (USA, UK, Japan, Germany). People in e.g. Chad do not have these issues, because they quite literally cannot afford to have them.

Good after-school activities might help.

Anything that makes sense is an "uphill struggle". You can worry about your child getting addicted to Internet. Your father could worry about you getting addicted to TV. People in 1800s worried about 50% child mortality rate. The parameters of the games are set, but whether you will or will not have kids is your choice.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Ikar said:

 

Are you sure you prioritize your life correctly, if you are lacking energy at the end of the day as a father? Do you work to help your family? Or do you work to evade your family duties? Do you live to work? Or do you work to live?

Do you think raising a child should be easy, or difficult? Are you willing to let go of some materialistic goods to spend more time with your family?

---

Some other thoughts; I'm writing them down, because I am writing a blog post on a topic close to this.

Gaming addicts tend to not be poor in a way that would threaten their survival. It takes time (and money) to afford the "luxury" of being addicted. It explains why most people on GQ are from the West (USA, UK, Japan, Germany). People in e.g. Chad do not have these issues, because they quite literally cannot afford to have them.

Good after-school activities might help.

Anything that makes sense is an "uphill struggle". You can worry about your child getting addicted to Internet. Your father could worry about you getting addicted to TV. People in 1800s worried about 50% child mortality rate. The parameters of the games are set, but whether you will or will not have kids is your choice.

It is cool that all the valuable things in life require you to work towards them- I mean it hedges you somewhat from the bad habits and gets you to expend your energy in the right way. 

The “energy” - I am in a major fight right now to change my long held views.

From high school people noticed I was too stressed by things without releasing it. this carried on into employment where my employer was throwing work at me without giving instruction or training. Two guys that joined us got into confrontations that they weren’t given training to do the work. This is when I started noticing that fighing is worth it and conflicts are human nature. Yet I persisted and so the worrying took its toll and made me quite drained long term.

As to the other questions. I want to work to support my family and to have a meaningful calling in my life. So work serves a dual purpose for me, I will get out of a job that I am not passionate about. I don’t feel like family duties are “hard”, I enjoy them. I have a heightened fear because my parents “missed” my gaming addiction.

The last question is hard to answer because it depends upon the circumstances. My father was quite attached to his friends, which makes me wonder what is the ideal amount of time to spend with a child? Maybe it is the quality of interaction that plays a more significant role.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...