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NEW VIDEO: I Replaced Gaming With Real Life (Nicco Transformation)

The Only Finite Resource - Time


giblets

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I have been doing a lot of reflecting recently about the finite resource that we all have and what separates the people from repeating the cycle of non-improvement from those who never satisfy their appetite for getting better and achieving more.

Let's face it - it could possibly be the same element that brought every member of the forums here in the first place.

Anyway, the way I have been using it recently to discourage myself from returning to gaming is writing down how much time it would take to "achieve" things in games versus the time it would take to achieve bucket list items in life. You would be surprised how much extra time you can create for yourself in life to achieve your life goals by removing games. For example, using Cam's recent video on WoW:

 

168 hours to get to max level in Wow.

Compared to:

56-130 hours to train for a Marathon.

170-182 hours to study at college per semester.

 

You could use the same formula for consuming content. The original thought came from a podcast where someone compared:

71 hours to watch all Game of Thrones.

Compared to:

60-80 hours to get a Pilot's licence.

 

I am going to work on this post a little bit more to make a personal database to help me stay on the straight and narrow, but I thought I would put the idea here if anyone else thinks it might be of use for them.

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45 minutes ago, giblets said:

Let's face it - it could possibly be the same element that brought every member of the forums here in the first place.

Yes, I think I mentioned that a few weeks ago as well. We have a limited amount of time and we can only do this much with it.

I guess the important thing to realize is that healthy hobbies generally spread across time a lot more than addictions. It's not difficult to watch 70 hours of series during a week, but studying for 70 hours a week is impossible for most, and even if it was possible, I wouldn't think it would be efficient at all.

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 10/6/2019 at 2:55 AM, giblets said:

reflecting recently about the finite resource that we all have and what separates the people from repeating the cycle of non-improvement from those who never satisfy their appetite for getting better and achieving more.

Poverty and habitually poor decisions vs bringing the money in and habitually good decisions, for the most part.

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On 10/19/2019 at 11:20 PM, goodvibes said:

Poverty and habitually poor decisions vs bringing the money in and habitually good decisions, for the most part.

Don't even need to bring money in.

People who make a habit of wise decisions generally will do a lot better in all areas of life than those who do not.

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On 10/20/2019 at 5:20 AM, goodvibes said:

Poverty and habitually poor decisions vs bringing the money in and habitually good decisions, for the most part.

 

6 hours ago, seriousjay said:

Don't even need to bring money in.

People who make a habit of wise decisions generally will do a lot better in all areas of life than those who do not.

The trouble is, a lot of people today bank on debt and they don't even need to feel the scarcity of money, until executor confiscates their property. They also can't start saving, if they think there's nothing to save, even if they are debt-free. To truly make informed and perhaps bold decisions, where they can afford to leave their job for a while and perhaps look for something better, they need to have some kind of a financial cushion. It's really a horrible life of a man with no options otherwise.

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21 hours ago, Ikar said:

 

The trouble is, a lot of people today bank on debt and they don't even need to feel the scarcity of money, until executor confiscates their property. They also can't start saving, if they think there's nothing to save, even if they are debt-free. To truly make informed and perhaps bold decisions, where they can afford to leave their job for a while and perhaps look for something better, they need to have some kind of a financial cushion. It's really a horrible life of a man with no options otherwise.

Well I wasn't specifically talking about money or jobs, just in general. Health, productivity, etc.

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Much can be done to improve without money for example calisthenics, running, library reading, abstinence from gaming/alcohol/porn/addiction though will only take you so far.

While money is separate from our value as a human being it becomes a necessary tool to invest further in ourselves to grow. Examples: leaving an abusive home or workplace, more hobbies & social opportunities, buying books the local library doesn't carry, buying into home equipment and calisthenic programs to take home fitness to a new level, increasing your daily calorie intake so you can exercise more often and be more productive. 

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