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My Gaming Addiction Story


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@BooksandTrees Hi, I read your story, can't really relate, because I was addicted to MOBA games, but I used to play as many hours as you did. 

Anyways, I spent most of my childhood and teenage years playing games, and I didn't really use that time to learn people or socialize, or anything like that and I am 24 now and I consider my social skills as terrible. Do you have any advice for that?

Thank you in advance.

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58 minutes ago, Stanly Kwok said:

@BooksandTrees Hi, I read your story, can't really relate, because I was addicted to MOBA games, but I used to play as many hours as you did. 

Anyways, I spent most of my childhood and teenage years playing games, and I didn't really use that time to learn people or socialize, or anything like that and I am 24 now and I consider my social skills as terrible. Do you have any advice for that?

Thank you in advance.

I would say that it's going to take some trial and error. I got a job as a cashier while I was in college and forced myself to talk to everyone in my line. After a few awkward conversations I became comfortable having introduction conversations with strangers. I then became friends with coworkers and then my college peers from class. 

If you don't have a job now I'd suggest one. I think they're good at natural ice breakers. You can also try to join some smaller meetups or online calls to practice. Maybe a boardgame group e.t.c. 

Treat people the same way you'd want to be treated. Realize nobody gets to talk about themselves too often so if you ask them questions you can fish for answers that you relate to. I'd avoid controversial topics like politics. Easy things people enjoy like movies or music can lead to hobby discussions. Food and restaurants are big too even though the quarantine hinders that a bit. 

Understand you're going to have embarrassing conversations. I have had some painful conversations and wanted to hide under a rock lol. But I never see some of these people again so it's fine. Good luck. You can also message me on my diary if you'd like. 

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@BooksandTrees Haha I have had a lot of embarassing conversations, in real life and online. At times I had so many of them in a row, and then got so disappointed and decided not to talk to anyone anymore, believing that I will be alone forever. I guess I have to keep trying and figure out this skill. Thanks for the feedback and good luck for you too 🙂

Edited by Stanly Kwok
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Hey, 

Thanks for sharing your story, definitely takes a lot of courage. One thing that has definitely helped me in deciding to quit video games is realizing that our love and addiction for them often has to do with the past.  "This made me think back to the one game that was always peaceful to me: RuneScape.  So I started again, from scratch on the Old School servers.  I was 13 again". I can definitely relate with the RuneScape story and also Halo 3. I used to pour countless hours of my time when I was 12-13 on RuneScape, even though I only played on free to play servers. With Halo, I used to go over to a friend's house and play countless hours of online split-screen with him. The one thing I have realized, however, is that these games will never be the same to me. The beautiful thing about playing RuneScape, Halo, MW2, etc is that I played these games when I was younger, when gaming was still fresh, exciting, and I played with all my friends. Now that I'm a bit older, I've come to realize that these days are long gone. I've already played a bunch of shooters, games are really no longer exciting and just a way to fill time that I don't know what else to do with, and my friends are either playing other games or have other priorities. 

I will always cherish the memories I have of gaming with my friends, but those days are over. The idea of gaming, and the emotions in the past that I have associated with gaming, not the reality of it, are what kept me gaming excessively for so long.

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  • 4 weeks later...
On 8/6/2020 at 4:30 PM, Jottrox said:

Hey, 

Thanks for sharing your story, definitely takes a lot of courage. One thing that has definitely helped me in deciding to quit video games is realizing that our love and addiction for them often has to do with the past.  "This made me think back to the one game that was always peaceful to me: RuneScape.  So I started again, from scratch on the Old School servers.  I was 13 again". I can definitely relate with the RuneScape story and also Halo 3. I used to pour countless hours of my time when I was 12-13 on RuneScape, even though I only played on free to play servers. With Halo, I used to go over to a friend's house and play countless hours of online split-screen with him. The one thing I have realized, however, is that these games will never be the same to me. The beautiful thing about playing RuneScape, Halo, MW2, etc is that I played these games when I was younger, when gaming was still fresh, exciting, and I played with all my friends. Now that I'm a bit older, I've come to realize that these days are long gone. I've already played a bunch of shooters, games are really no longer exciting and just a way to fill time that I don't know what else to do with, and my friends are either playing other games or have other priorities. 

I will always cherish the memories I have of gaming with my friends, but those days are over. The idea of gaming, and the emotions in the past that I have associated with gaming, not the reality of it, are what kept me gaming excessively for so long.

I just saw this. Sorry for the late reply. I'm glad you could relate to my story. It's tough losing your friends during the great transitions of life but I found that new experiences lead to greater passions for more tangible things and that brought along better friendships. Keep trying new activities and get creative with socializing during the virus. 

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