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ChooseLifeNotGames

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About ChooseLifeNotGames

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  1. Hello. I read your intro. I know this community can be helpful, but there is also another good website for addicted gamers called Olganon. It offers daily and weekly scheduled meetings. Your story sounds very similar to the ones posted on Olganon. It's a very mature community with a lot of helpful information too. Check it out as well if you require additional social support, especially the meetings. Kindest regards.
  2. Those Hello. Those past social experiences were terrible, and I'm sorry it happened. We can look at it as something that didn't happen 'to' you, but happened 'for' you. In other words, if you look at it as victim mentality, you will definitely feel like you cannot experience anything other than harsh treatment by people in society. First, a little reality check. Our current western society is horrendously 'me' and 'image' focused. In some circumstances, yes, this will work if you alter the way you look, how you talk, and how you approach people, but ultimately it's about you being genuine and comfortable with yourself even if you screw up. You are going to falter for a little while as you engage again with socializing. That's expected, given that you probably are fixating on bad memories. What I would do, is start small. I'd volunteer somewhere, where you're giving your time to help others in need. Food banks, hospitals, charities. Once a week. This type of social experience will habituate you to think about other people, and not focus on yourself, especially when you're helping the disadvantaged. Volunteer work can also be a safe place to practice basic social skills. Choose your social platforms wisely at first. You're starting out fresh, and you want the best chance of success. But start small. I'd also keep a written journal and write down all the positive social experiences, not just the negatives.
  3. Hey people, So you've moved on from video games and found meaning in your life again with new hobbies and interests. Has your life now influenced any of your former gamer friends? Have they reflected about their own addiction because of how you've turned your life around? What was their reaction to the changes in your life?
  4. I'll ask in the Ask Community forum. I cant get into too much detail about gamer friend.
  5. I think that there are other ways to spend time with your sister. If this has been going on for a couple of years and she won't relent to the idea that gaming is no longer a part of your life, then it's probably something more to do with the emotional bonds you have with your sister than the game itself. I think she misses your company. I don't know if you spend time with her outside of the gaming realm? If I were you, I'd take her out for coffee, sit down somewhere relaxing and have a heart to heart talk with her about how your life is now. And explain to her that you are very happy in life, but that you would like to spend time with her in hobbies that don't involve video games. I wish you the best of luck.
  6. Hello. I stopped playing video games over one year ago. I have a friend who I think is addicted. He games until the early hours of the morning, and sleeps in until he can wake up and the routine starts all over again. I don't think he has a steady job right now. I suspect he doesn't really want to work that much so he can game all day. He just bought a new expansion too, and I'm pretty sure he's gaming because it's money invested, and it's easier to game during Winter season. At least that's what I assume. Sometimes I don't say much about my life now to him, because he doesn't have a lot going on. My life now is very different than it was when I gamed. I think that if I discuss my hobbies with him, it will make him feel bad. I have some questions for this community: 1) Did you quit games because somebody influenced you to? Work colleague, spouse, friend, sibling, parent, etc? 2) Did you ignore the person who pointed out that you have an addiction? 3) Did you feel uncomfortable around people who had other hobbies going on in their life besides gaming? 4) Did you cut off friendships with people who are non-gamers? Thanks for your time. I'm accepting the fact that I can't change this person, but that hopefully I can be a positive influence because I don't play video games anymore, and that my life is fulfilling in other ways. If you have any other suggestions about what I can do as a friend, let me know. Peace.
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