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Cam Adair

Addiction to loot boxes?

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Are you or have you been addicted to loot boxes?

There is a lot happening in the U.S. around potential state regulations and there is a major media piece being done on it.

They are looking for people who have struggled with an addiction to loot boxes to share their experience (can remain anonymous).

This story will have a ton of potential to bring awareness to this issue and inspire others who need help to seek it. If you're interested in contributing to the community in this way, reply or PM me with your email.

Thanks in advance!

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I used to have a huge problem with CSGO cases. I would regularly buy keys and open every case I got which was a lot considering how much I played. The worst point was spending over £250 in one sitting trying to get a knife. After a while opening cases it became boring as  never really got anything good. This led to me starting to buy skins straight off the market because felt inadequate with my lack of good skins. I just wanted more and more and this ended up with me having a bit of a gambling problem aswell as I would often use gambling websites and bet my most expensive skins. I lost a lot for money this way and i just couldn't stop until I realised that I had a problem . After telling my friend about my problems I got rid of my remaining skins and vow to never buy keys again  to the this at I haven't. In terms of how much I've spent on keys/skins I'd say around £1500 and when  sold all of the skins I hadn't left got £170 steam cash so I lost quite a chunk  gambling and keys.

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15 minutes ago, JoeFish said:

I used to have a huge problem with CSGO cases. I would regularly buy keys and open every case I got which was a lot considering how much I played. The worst point was spending over £250 in one sitting trying to get a knife. After a while opening cases it became boring as  never really got anything good. This led to me starting to buy skins straight off the market because felt inadequate with my lack of good skins. I just wanted more and more and this ended up with me having a bit of a gambling problem aswell as I would often use gambling websites and bet my most expensive skins. I lost a lot for money this way and i just couldn't stop until I realised that I had a problem . After telling my friend about my problems I got rid of my remaining skins and vow to never buy keys again  to the this at I haven't. In terms of how much I've spent on keys/skins I'd say around £1500 and when  sold all of the skins I hadn't left got £170 steam cash so I lost quite a chunk  gambling and keys.

Thanks for sharing! 

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A small blurb, I guess. I've only struggled with this kind of addiction briefly (thankfully). Skins, cosmetic items. I'll try and keep it short and sweet (and fail), these are my thoughts based on my own experience and watching others, and I hope they can give food for thought and help with the project. I personally feel, that with the de-evolution of difficulty and challenge in games, has come this new beast. Players (myself included) want to feel that sense of progress, they want it visualized - they want to see that they're stronger. With the advent of lootboxes, the virtual removal of cosmetic items (you actually want, that aren't random) from being achieved by normal gameplay, game companies now have an excuse to make people spend money, money for their progress - their cosmetic/visual progress. Before, in games you'd unlock a new look the traditional way, clearing some bosses, farming, whatever. But right now, that is a relic of the past.

They justify it with regurgitated slogans like "these items are only cosmetic and do not affect gameplay." But, psychologically they do, they affect the players perceptions of themselves - if they've advanced or not (the item quality colors tacked onto these cosmetics, are a nice psychological touch). This dirty trick makes people who are invested into the game, the ones who want their visual/cosmetic progress, bound to pay money for that progress which was originally free. And, while some systems in place give free lootboxes, this is equal to what is known as a Skinner Box. The more randomized the rewards, the more the rat (the player) will actually pull at the lever (leveling up, etc.) for more rewards, simply due to the excitement of not knowing what's next and the chance at an even bigger reward. Games, are now not only designed to suck money from the player, but also get them addicted to both the game itself and the gambling aspect.

More gameplay, more disappoints from rewards, more time invested, money spent. It goes from fun and turns into a Vicious Circle, and then contributes to players investing themselves in what ultimately becomes a Sunken Cost Fallacy (they don't wanna quit). For many, you're no longer playing because it's fun, you're playing because you've invested time and money into something and you don't want it all to go to waste. Games now aren't about beating the bad guy and saving the princess, turning it off and moving on with your life. Games now are often, virtually an infinite loop to keep you playing and playing.

In the end, the one who wins is the company profiting from the game.

Edited by Death13

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