Limited Time: Book a 1 on 1 coaching session (1hr) with Cam ($97). Click Here.

The Journey Within

287 posts in this topic

Posted

@Simms You're absolutely right that I need to cling to these memories. They'll ground me when I lose sight or want to give up. I've visualized the day I get an acceptance letter or don the white coat and stethoscope many times for the same reason. I bet you do the same for the more treacherous mountains you aspire to climb. Part of the privilege of watching your journey, is seeing you go through the process of training to get there; though, I imagine the mountain top experience will be especially rewarding for you.

 211 Days w/o Gaming, 2 Days w/o YouTube, 2 Days Meditated

Meditation is becoming easier, though I don't know if my mind is becoming more focused as I sit there. I hear that it's something you're going to suck at doing for the first year. It's helped that I've been icing/heating my back to heal it, which adds an extra boost to see this time as well spent. I've found that the more benefits an action has, the easier it is to do it.

My time spent piddling around on the internet was minimal today as well. I realize how much I was using it as a coping mechanism before. Without the stress of school it's much easier to avoid. It's only when I'm extremely fatigued and at an emotional low point that it becomes a problem these days. This is the reason I was able to go over a month during Christmas break, until I got sick. I'm hoping in these next few months I can kick it for good.

Also, more and more I'm excited about the exponential growth that is going to come in the next few years as a result of the habits I'm trying to develop now. It was a tough decision, but I'm feeling confident about my choice to postpone finishing my degree in pursuit of building some foundational skills I've been lacking. It very much looks to be a balancing act of not going too far to one extreme or the other when it comes to building habits.

Lastly, as I do research on the skills I want to develop, I'm trying to keep an open mind. As I touched on yesterday, I once was extremely dogmatic and chose to surround myself with dogmatic people. The loss of those friends was difficult when I changed my views to less rigid ones, but I'm grateful for that decision. You will learn much more, experience much more, and grow much more when you stop judging ideas that are from a different paradigm from the one you're used to, and start to explore their merits for yourself.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

212 Days w/o Gaming, 0 Days w/o YouTube, 3 Days Meditated

That was a short streak. I got really stressed out today, because there wasn't a sense of mutual respect in one of my friendships. That same friend ended up texting me today and I decided to be bluntly honest in my reply and address the issues I'd been thinking about, rather than being diplomatic as I usually do. There was an argument initially, but we both ended up feeling better for it. This validates what I've been thinking: living authentically (not caring about how the outside world perceives you) may be difficult, but it is by far the most rewarding path.

Guess that goes to show that social stress can be just as much a trigger as school can. Stress is stress. And man, it sucks I didn't even make it a week. I'm still trying to recover from how agitated out school was making me before. I still feel so high-strung, even though I have a much lighter schedule now. I know that it'll all click much better when I build up habits that will resist stress in healthy ways, but that will take time. I need to remember that quitting youtube is my top priority right now, and that one small lapse in the morning leads to the whole dam breaking and flooding over the rest of that day and onward. The only way to win is to not play that game.

2 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

There is no winner in compromise, but it's so exhausting. I hate it.

I know a day on YouTube sucks, but I'm spending my second day at the computer now, and I'm kind of glad to. I mean, I know I should do stuff, but I can't be bothered. Maybe you sometimes need it that way? There is a slim margin between self torture and discipline that is constructive. Surely, we're unable to ever tell the difference, but telling yourself "I must do this and that" doesn't help... It's thinking about the good stuff that gets me to do good things. I do sports not because "I must!" but because I know I feel better afterwards. Because I wanna punch someone in the face.

So uh... maybe don't see "stopping Internet surfing" but see what gains you have from it. I know that's hard because you might lack other "good experiences", perspective, I am questing for that myself. Staring at the ground all day don't help much, but that's gravity I guess. You can't always fight gravity, just sometimes. I'm rambling.

Edited by destoroyah
2 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

Day 221

It's funny, it's been well over a week, and yet when I look at the post above I'm still having problems with that friend I wrote about. I started calling her out more when she would vent and yell at me, and so this Saturday she finally lost her shit and wouldn't interact with me the whole night when I went out dancing with her and our friends. I texted her later about it, and found out she was purposefully trying to push me out of life because I did something that angered her, and she wouldn't tell me what it was. I was in a dark place for the rest of the night. I know it sounds silly how hard I took that, but I was just in shock of how abruptly that friendship ended. It added insult to injury that I felt as if I were the one that was being consistently disrespected and just took it because I knew she was going through a hard time. I'm still confused now. How do I handle the fact that a friend now sees me as an enemy, when I've spent the last half year trying to support them? Hurts like hell because of how invested I became. I've left the metaphorical door slightly cracked for her if she is willing to see how absurd this is, but either way I'm moving on with my life so I don't get hurt like that again. I definitely need to learn the paradox between compassion and emotional detachment.

I took the next day to just recover, and move on, which did involve quite a bit of time on youtube. I also watched Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them. That's where I shifted from being depressed to gaining understanding. The protagonist isn't a he-man, and he isn't the stereotypical action hero. He's a soft-spoken ecologist (that's the best term I could come up with for a magical creature collector) that has a child-like wonder. That's how I've been regaining my joy: child-like wonder. When I'm outside I am amazed at the beauty of the trees, and smile at the birds. People on the streets aren't strangers anymore. They're potential friends to meet. I've been making more time for the friends I do have. The small things matter more. Just eating a simple meal, spending time with my parents, and even just laying down on the floor and being silent for a moment. The large things are put into trajectory and then put out of mind, just as the past is once it has been parsed over for useful lessons.

In accordance with not sweating the small stuff, I've stopped counting the days I've been meditating or on youtube. I've been meditating very consistently, and on youtube only occasionally and for short periods of time. If there are only minor mess-ups in both, there's no need to be so strict: 

I know a day on YouTube sucks, but I'm spending my second day at the computer now, and I'm kind of glad to. I mean, I know I should do stuff, but I can't be bothered. Maybe you sometimes need it that way? There is a slim margin between self torture and discipline that is constructive.

It's time to take charge of my life. If I'm unhappy or feel detached from my friends, only by taking personal ownership can that be fixed.

2 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

Day 223

Growth comes from being willing to let the old go and fully accepting the new. The pain of losing a friend is there still to a degree, but I am grateful for this new chapter that is opening. To fill that social void I'm now more open to playing D&D with a group of friends that have been inviting me for months. I went for the first time last week and had a blast, and plan on creating my own character this week and joining them again. I also have been making a more concerted effort to reach out to old friends that I have not been seeing so much. I've made a commitment to grow stronger.

Overall, the main two lessons I'm trying to learn right now are: 1. How to find true peace, by accepting the present moment. 2. How to make the most of every second; walking the tight-rope between efficiency and leisure. I'm hoping that I'll have made a lot more progress towards them both in the coming months

4 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

I took the next day to just recover, and move on, which did involve quite a bit of time on youtube.

 

When I'm outside I am amazed at the beauty of the trees, and smile at the birds. People on the streets aren't strangers anymore. They're potential friends to meet. I've been making more time for the friends I do have. The small things matter more. Just eating a simple meal, spending time with my parents, and even just laying down on the floor and being silent for a moment. The large things are put into trajectory and then put out of mind, just as the past is once it has been parsed over for useful lessons.

In accordance with not sweating the small stuff, I've stopped counting the days I've been meditating or on youtube. I've been meditating very consistently, and on youtube only occasionally and for short periods of time. If there are only minor mess-ups in both, there's no need to be so strict: 

I know a day on YouTube sucks, but I'm spending my second day at the computer now, and I'm kind of glad to. I mean, I know I should do stuff, but I can't be bothered. Maybe you sometimes need it that way? There is a slim margin between self torture and discipline that is constructive.

It's time to take charge of my life. If I'm unhappy or feel detached from my friends, only by taking personal ownership can that be fixed.

I am really happy I caught up with your latest "story arc" if you will. 

You are doing absolutely fantastic. I have been quite on and off myself, in all honesty I'm getting there, I feel the growth but something still does not align. And that something is my commitment. But more about that in my journal (#ShamelessSelfAdvertiser).

Let's start with your breakdown and choice to waste time. It is fine. I understand you need to take charge of your life but imagine if you held a tangerine in your hand. A magical tangerine that gains more fractions each time you make a new friend or experience. Someone just took one out. You already created the space for it in your palm and it is gone. This is lowkey the stupidest metaphor I came up with in a really long time but it works. You panicked, but you didn't fall apart. You let loose for a day but then were quick to rise to your feet again. Outstanding execution. You are not a machine. None of us are. We are all human. Human, all too human. ;)  

Reading your next paragraph actually made me feel at home for a bit. Your mere words deliver the sensation of the lesson you took away from this. You see the world openly once again. I actually expanded my friend circle so rapidly this season I need to take a step back and build relationships with the people I already know haha. DnD can be amazing with good friends, I'm really happy you went. Make sure you debrief us on your character! 

Your choice to stop counting days also seems very much reasonable. However if you ever catch yourself falling behind on the habit feel free to reintroduce the counter. It is what I will do in the close future too! :) 

 

I also lost a friend a while ago for a solid 2 year period btw. He entered a relationship that was horribly manipulative from both ends and ended up taking all his time. But for the last few months we've been talking again, needless to say because they broke up. I don't know what happened with you and your friend but it might turn out fine. But some people will not come back and that will be okay too. The real question is, will this matter in five years? Will this matter in 100? Does this matter now? And the answer is, almost without a doubt, "No". 

Swiftly, Silently Stride for Serenity. 

-Csaba

 

2 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

You know, I've lost many "friends" myself, recounting them has frequently filled me with happiness. The girl you write about fills me with anger and would be a candidate for that list any day:

[...]she was purposefully trying to push me out of life because I did something that angered her, and she wouldn't tell me what it was. 

 What good is friendship – or a relationship, if you don't have honesty and clarity? How the fuck are you supposed to know what is "wrong" and "right" if there are no words said?

A person like that can stay the fuck away from me, gladly, any day. When I raise the window blinds in my room in the morning, I always think about a person that I am glad not to miss. It soothes my heart, knowing that I am not playing emotional roulette being around them.

 

I've left the metaphorical door slightly cracked for her if she is willing to see how absurd this is, but either way I'm moving on with my life so I don't get hurt like that again. I definitely need to learn the paradox between compassion and emotional detachment.

Oh, open doors are dangerous. I would tell her that she's stupid. It would be expected of me. I don't ever want to bottle up again. I've bemoaned loss often enough to know that there is usually no way back with idiots, interestingly telling them off usually helps the relationship. But mind – my advice should only be used to triangulate normality!!

Surely you don't want to get hurt like that again, the thing is... not to avoid getting hurt, but to act right when you are hurt. Avoiding the pain beforehand might turn you stiff and unemotional. You will turn cold and lonely. Getting hurt ain't so bad, but don't go on drinking or hiding in someway now. Embrace it, feel it to the end, short and acutely. Let out what needs to get out. If it's too sick, unreasoned or perverted – pursue an art. Writing is fine, but sometimes words are too precise and you need colors, melodies or a broken knuckle as camouflage for your inner ugliness. Be self aware though, because if you aren't, you are just hiding again.

Pen and Paper roleplay could actually very well be that art, you might be able to conjure those emotions out of yourself by taking the role of a character. Exaggerated emotions and reasonless violence in fantasy can be a great medium to rid yourself from hidden feelings. I've managed to discover new strengths in character by doing P&P, you can practice being "convincing", "hurt", "frightening" and all these things on safe ground without serious consequence. In real life you only have one chance, and usually we fuck it up because we rarely practice. Theater is also good for this.

 

It was really fun reading your journal though, even if that romance turned into shit – you're going to gain from it either way, embrace it. I wish you well!

Edited by destoroyah
2 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

@Csaba_Bekesi Your messages bring me encouragement and hope. In fact, your hope is contagious, and I really appreciate it. Also, I like the tangerine idea. The choas of losing a wedge causes us to reassess and ultimately make smarter decisions... so long as we don't allow despair to overtake us. A friend shared a metaphor with me that reminded me of yours, that you might enjoy, though it is very different in application. She recommended starting everyone you meet off at a score of 100. As you interact with them you increase or decrease points. This gives you a more big-picture view of who's a giver and who's a taker. This method should be used very loosely, of course, as using such simple metrics for humans can be incredibly dangerous, but it's good for seeing general trends. Thanks for the kind words and wisdom.

@destoroyah As I was writing that I was leaving the metaphorical door to my life open, I knew I was being dumb. It makes it a lot easier when someone else points that out as well, in their own way, and I really appreciate you being one of many helping hands that has assisted me in shutting that door and lock it. I chalk it up the difficulty of doing so on my own to the "nice guy" syndrome I've been trying to overcome the past year. Nice guys are people-pleasers and are manipulative. Alternatively, kind people act from a place of authenticity, which is different. They're badasses. I see many badass traits in you, and I try to glean as many as I can from what you write. Thanks man.

 Day 226

Today was pretty laid back (other than getting Schwifty about Rick and Morty season three!), so I'm going to focus on yesterday. Some people couldn't make it to DnD, so we played frisbee instead. The park where we met was having a giant event, and taking in all of the sights and activities was pretty amazing. I met and talked with people I hardly knew, and really tried to get to know the people I came with more deeply as well. We were up to all kinds of shenanigans: learning proper pull-up form using playground equipment, doing the cupid shuffle in the middle of a field of people, performing outrageous dance moves before each frisbee pass, and talking about all manner of things ranging from the wacky to the profound. I've realized that making friends and being happy are both much easier to come by when you take the offensive, rather than trying to cling to them on the defensive. On that note, one of my friends there gave me great advice on how to break physical barriers with other people: he'll spontaneously trust fall (from a seated position so that gravity can do less damage if the other person bails) onto someone he's getting to know, and sees if they push him away. If they don't, he knows that they'll likely be open to more physical touch in the future. This is the kind of offense-focused social mindset I'm taking about. This ties into the theme of the day that I was trying to learn: simple joy and awe. At the park we were surrounded by two demographics that were much larger there than in most places: children and dogs. They both possessed that simple joy and awe for life. Even as a group of young adults we were exhibiting those same traits there, because we were comfortable with each other and comfortable with ourselves.

I've come so far in five years in learning how to be myself. I don't want to stop. I've learned how to be outgoing, how to use humor again, be unashamed at making inappropriate comments, to dance and look stupid and not care. I've learned to embrace friends not on how similar we are, but in how open-minded and kind-hearted they are. It's for this reason that I'm trying to meet with a different friend every almost every day this week (did it last week), and I've spontaneously decided to join a friend in going to a piano recital this Tuesday. I know this kind of behavior may not be sustainable in the near future, but I know that this foundation is very important right now. A foundation in being positive, friendly, and open to possibilities. A foundation in being happy. The productivity stuff doesn't really serve much of a purpose if you aren't even happy. I'll continue with that stuff, but it's going way behind figuring out the art of happiness for now.

“To be yourself in a world that is constantly trying to make you something else is the greatest accomplishment.” - Ralph Waldo Emerson

 

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

Being on the "offensive" is very good with people. Being firm and able to ask them questions and stand by your opinion and hobbies – even if they are "uncool" – is strength that people often admire. Showing weakness is good. Telling them where you want to go and what you want to see, planning and asking them out is also very good in establishing friendships.

Many people think like they are helping by answering questions and being open to visitors. Well... actually I think that in this time and age it takes more effort to visit people and ask them for help or information than being on the other side and "giving" from the safe ground. Saying "Hello" first is breaking the ice, many will feel important when being greeted and will get cocky about it – but in reality the one greeting first is the one to be respected for his/her courage to potentially put themselves in an awkward position and ability to show respect.

I don't know why it has come to be like this, that asking for help and showing respect are traits of strong people – it seems paradoxical. I often try to take the offensive, because this way you can choose how to spend your time and have a fun life, at the same time it is also important not to get too "greedy" though and let others speak after you've broken the ice. So be patient when you got something to say, and start talking when times are boring and no one likes to talk. Or something like that!

I think it's really good that you spend time with your friends doing new things. I like how your journal is turning out, there is more action! In P&P when people couldn't come, our "Master" would always invent a story why they are knocked out in the bushes, feeling ill or doing some things – sometimes he would play the characters of the absent people when they were crucial for the story to move on, but he would call them up and ask them beforehand if it was something important. He would often talk to people in private in general, he did a pretty good job in making the story a team effort. The bigger a group gets, the higher the chance that someone won't be able to make it – you gotta develop methods to get it moving on, otherwise it will swamp. Especially if people cancel very abruptly before, because then they should be sort of "punished" for that behavior.

 

Edited by destoroyah
1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

@destoroyah I find that introverts benefit from the learning the skill set of extroverts, and vice versa. The listener does well to learn to be the initiator, and the talker can do much for themselves to learn to help others open up. Thanks for sharing your perspective.

Day 232

I have mixed feelings about this week. I've been gaining more balance in my life, and hitting many milestones, yet the void within is still there. I don't really have the energy to go through it all right now. There were high points, including getting to go out with friends three times this week. There were also low points. I'm still trying to find out how to deeply connect with others. Every time I've tried to do so, other than with my parents, there has been great pain. If I could figure out how to deal with that I would be a great deal happier than life.

It's paradoxical. I'm miserable when I spend so much time on my own, so much time in my own head, but I'm also miserable around others because they don't understand how I think. Being understood is indeed over-rated, and therein is likely the problem. I don't have easy answers on how to move past that. Furthermore, I cause the people around me great pain when they see me constantly oscillating between the joy of trying to experience the moment and connect with others, only to fall into depression the next day when I get stuck in my thoughts and find myself disconnected.

It's in dark times like these that I rethink my life. What gives it meaning. Truth gives it meaning, but it eludes me. There has been no Deus Ex Machina that will reach its hand down and hand me a scroll with the answers. My own searching has provide very ambiguous answers itself. So, besides Truth I have Compassion. So many in pain, so many places in disrepair. There is much purpose in trying to bring about healing.

Ultimately, there needs to be inner healing first. I'm not much good to others if I'm broken myself. There has to be something more. There has to be a way out of the pit, and a way to stay out. I hate being here, and I find myself here so often.

This shows that Compassion will die out if it is not paired with Strength. The kind are crushed under foot by the strong man who takes advantage of their credulity. The virtue of kindness becomes equated with a vice for fools. That is why the power to back up those good intentions is needed. The ability to sustain injuries to the psyche and mend them; to be lashed back and forth by the wind and keep pressing forward.

Those are the three virtues I've based my life around for over a year. Truth, Compassion, and Strength. Reminding myself of them here has helped. If I am to find any lasting peace I must continue to nourish them. I often feel that they are what keeps my mind from being torn asunder. 

I will find the answers I seek. I will be whole again. I will make a difference.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

Day 233

I woke up at 5am in the morning and was thinking about how I can beat the funk I was in last night. I then realized that the Stoics, Buddhists, and Taoists are right: desire is the root of suffering. I desire to be close to people so much. I become attached. I will not be happy until I am potentially willing to let those things go. In fact, I want to center my life around becoming stronger: intellectually, physically, and by learning new skills. Doing that is what will add to my joy of life, and help me progress towards my goals.

Also, I must not forget that the present moment is beautiful. It is beautiful. I am complete. I want to smell the roses. Happiness does not come from the future, because we will never reach it there. Happiness comes from the here and now.

I hold the door shut to my own cage. All I need to do is choose to walk out, and stay out. Then I can enjoy the sunshine and flowers outside (a friend once told me that if I stop over thinking I’d see the flowers).

 

So, practically speaking, what do I do? I remember the attitude that I had earlier in the week: child-like wonder, enjoying each and every moment (whether in serene contemplation alone or in the warm company of others), and by growing stronger. Joy and strength, which is a bit redundant because I believe joy is one of the greatest forms of strength, as is kindness in the face of adversity. One new way I've been growing stronger is doing math on Khan Academy. I've shied away from math ever since middle school; didn't have much of an aptitude for it. I'm excited to slowly build myself back up to become proficient at it, wanting to tackle physics next. 

May the times I take the beauty of the world (and the beauty of the people within it) for granted be few and far between.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

Day 235

Today I was tempted to go back to gaming. This rarely happens, because I have so many other vices that I could go to since I know how unfulfilling gaming is and have broken through the "withdrawal phase", and yet today it was calling my name. It was calling for the same reason I started gaming and the same reason I continued: disconnection from others. It's strange, but even though I have tremendously better social skills, have plenty of friends/social ties to other groups, know of lots of events around town, have a means of transportation, and have some funds for said events, I still feel disconnected on my end. Alone.

I didn't go back to gaming, and won't. Don't want to ever. I'm trying to go the other way in my life; less virtual, more reality. Still, I have to address that feeling of isolation that will take me back down the path of depression if I don't deal with it (and that's assuming that the last wave has fully been recovered from).

I see two paths (there are more, but these are the two most feasible): 1. Continue to search for relationships in which I "feel" connected (emphasis on feel, because I do have a few really loyal and interesting friends), and redouble my efforts. 2. Find a way to fulfill these needs within, most likely through some technique in which I can generate my own contentedness. Of course the answer is the second one, while still maintaining the first. Will that really work, though? It's been tried in the past.

Heck, maybe the disconnectedness doesn't stem from others, but from myself. If I have some problem with myself I will most definitely feel as if I have a problem with everyone else. It's hard to pinpoint what that problem is. Likely has to do with how I wasn't able to reach the mark in my academic goals, and am now choosing a much more uncertain path that will likely put my previous plans back half a decade; that's if I stick with those plans by then. Also has to do with wondering whether there is something internally wrong with the turnover rate I have with friends. Then again I have a high turnover rate on ideas. Likely associated. Probably overthinking.

"A friend once told me that if I stop over thinking I’d see the flowers."

 

I spoke with an old friend today over frisbee. A simple pleasure I don't get to partake in often, both the frisbee and the speaking with him; he works during the day. We spoke philosophy, and I posed the question of what is joy (euthymia). He is much more left-brained and fine details oriented than I, so he gave a much needed perspective. One interesting thing that he pointed out is that contentedness and having goals are not mutually exclusive. One can achieve desirelessness and still try to reach higher heights. Put this crudely, it seems to be a paradox, but this is something we all understand intuitively. To be happy with the present and reaching forward to the future.

 

Accepting the present life as it is, and enjoying it, and yet striving to be stronger. If I am to feel better I shall make my job to be appreciating every moment for its own intrinsic value.

 

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

My English teacher told me something I frowned upon back in high school, then I grew to understand it . I don't know if it is his quote or not, but it goes something like this. "The world to those who feel is a tragedy, a comedy to those who think." There is a reason I signed off with 'Life is Ludicrous' time and time again. I feel your pain of isolation. 

 

I keep going back to a book I listened to. The art of how not to give a fuck. It's a good read/listen. Truly. It has an interesting discussion of the metrics of happiness. It uses Dave Mustaine as an example because he went through life wanting to be bigger than metallica and that is the one thing he failed at. Therefore he was sad deeply all his life. Meanwhile the Metallica guys are leading a top life because their metric for happiness was success with their music. 

One of the things you need to do is consciously redefine your metric for happiness. You don't notice the flowers when you stop thinking. You will notice those flowers when it is part of your happiness to see them. You will quit your overthinking once your metric does not involve the maintenance of the "thinker" as part of your identity. You and I both have that now. And we both need to work on it. 

 

Your darkness comes from within. Try doing some gardening if you have a chance. Both literal and metaphorical. Look up Japanese gardens. Using space as a reflection of philosophy. I think you would appreciate that. 

 

Life is, you guessed it, Ludicrous, 

Darkness dissolves and Light Lingers,

 

Stay gold. 

-Csaba

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

@Csaba_Bekesi Thanks my friend. You're right, I do need to redefine my metric. Tentatively, I'd like to define it as the ability to enjoy the present moment, no matter what that moment involves. I say this over and over here, because it is easy to believe in the abstract sense, but difficult to apply in the real world. Thus the tentativeness.

The garden within. I like that. Tending to the garden within (the mind) and the garden without (how we perceive the external world) will likely involve having a more positive outlook for both. The weeds are negative thoughts and perceptions.

Day 236

The more I have a positive outlook and surround myself with positive people, the more I succeed in being happy. Depression comes from being stuck in a negative loop. Joy comes from being stuck in a positive loop. Joy is the tool to fight addiction and to achieve goals. Joy makes the world a more uplifted place.

2 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

FrootLoops2.jpg

 

 

Eat them for breakfast.

2 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now